The Modern Presence of Shari’ah in English Civil Law

In the spring of 2013, a debate on the legal status of the Shari’ah (Islamic law) in England and Wales took place in the British House of Commons (1). Several issues were brought into question, seemingly in need of further clarity from the then-Conservative party and Liberal Democrat coalition government. Firstly, it was demanded that the government state whether there was only one law in … Continue reading The Modern Presence of Shari’ah in English Civil Law

Remade in the Vernacular: The BJP’s Right to Dominate Kashmir

Sick men flock here from many lands, And go back home in health; But my own men, racked with hunger and disease, Lie dying on my roads … If Mahjoor, compelled by love, Lays bare some bitter truths, The lovers of my beloved land Should not take it to heart! “Naalay Kashmir,” Mahjoor One of Kashmir’s most beloved poets, Mahjoor began his life as a … Continue reading Remade in the Vernacular: The BJP’s Right to Dominate Kashmir

Can a Nonhumanitarian Ethics Address Economic Inequality?

Revolution, often affected through battered souls ambushed by endless hardship, has taken on a romantic flavor in history classes. The possibility and promises of change through democracy dominates contemporary thinking. We are often taught that affecting upheaval in today’s world requires ideological commitment and hardy political maneuvering.  But need revolution be so grand? Maybe change is seeded in the acts so familiar to us in … Continue reading Can a Nonhumanitarian Ethics Address Economic Inequality?

Reconsidering the Liberal Asylum

In recent years, the right wing’s increased outward animosity towards Islam and Muslims has driven Muslims to become disillusioned with the conservative Republican party. Muslim immigrants to the United States used to disporportionately vote republican in the years preceding 9/11. George W. Bush’s campaign made calculated attempts to win over Muslims. Analysts attribute this behavior to republican politician Grover Norquist stating that because Muslims are … Continue reading Reconsidering the Liberal Asylum

Countering the Assault of Secularization

This piece is the final part of a three part policy report on the secularization of the Muslim mind. You can read part one here and part two here. The battle for the hearts and minds of Muslims comes while the Muslim world stands at a crossroad between liberation from authoritarian regimes and a continuation of corrupt neoliberal and neocolonial rule. If the Muslim community is … Continue reading Countering the Assault of Secularization

The US State and the Making of a Secular Islam

This piece is part two of a three part policy report on the secularization of the Muslim mind. You can read part one here and part three here.  Fear and the “Bad Muslim”: Identity and Radical Islam Islamic fundamentalists… [are determined] to restore the superiority of the Islamic civilization by resuscitating the past. They seek to impose the Sharia, a code of law based on … Continue reading The US State and the Making of a Secular Islam

The Secularization of the Muslim Mind

This piece is part one of a three part policy report on the secularization of the Muslim mind. You can read part two here.  This report aims to highlight a subtle yet existential threat to the Muslim community in America: an assault on the Muslim mind, in other words, the Secularization of the Muslim mind. In contrast to the right-wing’s physical and verbal attacks on … Continue reading The Secularization of the Muslim Mind

Deconstructing Western Representations of Political Islam

Introduction There is a spectre haunting the Muslim world, by the name of political Islam. Whether in the form of violent terrorist groups or in the guise of political parties pragmatically using the democratic process to gain power, it seems that everywhere behind the stunted development of Muslim-majority societies is the troublesome presence of political Islam. Observers of contemporary affairs will note Islamic politics as … Continue reading Deconstructing Western Representations of Political Islam

Dostoevsky’s Strange Ideas and the Modern Terrorist

While nothing is easier than to denounce the evildoer, nothing is more difficult than to understand him. [1] ​The quotation above is less a reflection of what Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881) actually said — as it remains unverified but frequently cited — but more of what the Russian author’s novels continue to offer us: an understanding of the evildoer. His novel, Crime and Punishment, is known for … Continue reading Dostoevsky’s Strange Ideas and the Modern Terrorist