Religious Symbols, Liberalism, and Laïcité in Quebec

In December 2021, a Muslim woman in Quebec, Canada lost her teaching position because she refused to remove her hijab in the classroom. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, despite his personal disagreement with the law that cost her a job, would not intervene in this “touchy subject,” as the bill under discussion was voted in democratically. This is the latest from a multi-year saga of the formation of the law aptly titled, An Act respecting the laicity of the State. [1] It is important to challenge the very premise that laïcité is a force for a just and plural society.  Continue reading Religious Symbols, Liberalism, and Laïcité in Quebec

Pervasive Capitalism and its Mutations – Does Iqtesaad Offer an Alternative?

From its genesis, capitalism has had near universal acceptance as being inextricably linked with all economic activity: good or bad. This impulsive position continues unabated, despite the tumult of the past few years. Even its detractors have found themselves wanting when trying to expunge the term from their collective psyche; As the fervent critic Ha Joon Chang says “capitalism is the worst economic system except for all the other forms.” [1] Continue reading Pervasive Capitalism and its Mutations – Does Iqtesaad Offer an Alternative?

Q&A with Sadiq Dorasat from Muslim Census

g Tradition has been delighted to interview Sadiq Dorasat, the co-founder of Muslim Census, a first of it’s kind polling organisation for Muslims in the UK. After graduating with a Mathematics degree, he has worked in Wealth & Asset Management, Digital Product, and now in Data Science for one of the largest retailers in the country. With Muslim Census, he has been interviewed by the likes of the BBC, Financial Times, The Independent and more speaking on the importance of data for Muslims. You can follow him on Twitter here and at Muslim Census. Continue reading Q&A with Sadiq Dorasat from Muslim Census

Castles of Delusion – Reflections of Power in “Throne of Blood” (1957)

We pan out only to see the ruins swallowed by the mist before vanishing altogether. So begins and so concludes Akira Kurosawa’s eerie period drama “Throne of Blood”. Throne of Blood is the late director’s adaptation of William Shakespeare’s Macbeth, trading the warring Scottish Highlands for feudal Japan. It wasn’t one of the famed Japanese auteur’s most lucrative works when it was released, neither domestically nor internationally, but in the decades since the film has garnered significant praise among his oeuvre of works. Continue reading Castles of Delusion – Reflections of Power in “Throne of Blood” (1957)

The Mashallah Muslims

The loft walls are painted in brilliant pink, on the upper floor of a house nested in a cozy Dallas suburb. Bright cupcakes, cute pastries, and party favors pepper a burnished stall specially designed by a social media event planner. Balloons with “It’s a Boy!”, fill the back corner of the room. Gift bags with the names of all those in attendance sit on a table near the front door. Continue reading The Mashallah Muslims

Al-Quran – Stories of Prophets and Emotional Intelligence

In our daily lives, we regularly encounter challenges affecting our emotions: We feel sad and happy, we may express ourselves by crying or laughing, or we may hide our true feelings behind a smile. Our emotions sometimes bring us to tears, yet we find ourselves comforted and serene in their aftermath. Memories of the past that bring joy to one person may bring heartache to … Continue reading Al-Quran – Stories of Prophets and Emotional Intelligence

Christmas and Why the ‘Petty’ is Powerful

celebrating Christmas in different capacities. While this may be more understandable for those new to the faith, or for those who have non-Muslim family members with whom participating in this holiday may be tricky to navigate, there are also an increasing number of Muslims who have jumped on the bandwagon of celebrating Christmas with really no compelling reason to do so – putting up decorations in their homes, Christmas trees, giving Christmas presents to their children, etc.  Continue reading Christmas and Why the ‘Petty’ is Powerful

Traversing Tradition Book Recommendations 2021

Commuting to and from work, hours have been freed for us to use at our discretion. A common complaint by those who don’t read is not necessarily that they don’t have time, it’s that they don’t know what to read. For some, it has been so long since they last picked up a book that they’ve forgotten what genres they used to enjoy. An easy way around this is to think about what you currently enjoy watching. Whether it’s shows on Netflix, video essays on YouTube or anime on your mate’s Crunchyroll, think about the subject matter and the overarching genres. Continue reading Traversing Tradition Book Recommendations 2021

In the Spirit of Fatima Al-Fihri

n recent years, Fatima al-Fihri, may Allah be pleased with her, has acquired a mythological, folklore-like status as the “founder of the world’s oldest university.” The magazine Girlboss credits her with  “establishing the university as we know it today.” Oxford Reference and UNESCO recognize University of al-Qarawiyyin as “the oldest operating university in the world.” Blog posts and news sources alike continue to embellish parts of her story, crediting her institution as the first to grant “academic degrees.” Continue reading In the Spirit of Fatima Al-Fihri